OPEN • SET: A New Bookbinding Competition in the United States

I have been waiting for this. It’s HUGE news: The American Academy of Bookbinding in Telluride, Colorado has announced the first year of what will be a triennial fine binding competition and exhibition in the United States. I’m really excited about this! [throws confetti in the air while doing a happy dance]

The competition is called OPEN • SET. It is the best of both worlds: a set book competition and an open book competition. Competitors can enter either or both categories. I love that. There are benefits and drawbacks to both types of competition. OPEN • SET levels the playing field by offering both options. AAB has specified that all three members of the blind jury will be well-known, professional fine binders. I am a neophyte in the traditions and politics of the binding world, but I have found myself puzzled by the composition of some panels of jurors. Again, I am a neophyte, so what I find odd might actually be sensible. Still, I find it reassuring that those at AAB who are organizing OPEN • SET are going to have professional fine binders judging fine bindings.

Below is what you need to know (click to see the full image). Stay tuned for updates.

AAB competition


Recent Acquisitions and Why

You know what I’m really good at? Buying books about bookbinding. I bought my first catalog of a bookbinding exhibit in April of 2000 (I still have the receipt). This is where my money goes, instead of feeding my family. Fortunately, since I’m good at it, I didn’t pay much for most of these. The Tarlau book is a notable exception in more than one way. I paid a lot for it and it’s a novel. My excuse? It’s a very thinly disguised autobiography. I can’t speak for the very personal details, but it’s about her experiences within the bookbinding community in France. Names have been changed, but even I can identify many of the characters. It’s an education.

Read the rest of this entry »


Manhattan Book Fair, Part 2

Rare Book Week is a big deal in New York City, where density is your friend. Three simultaneous book fairs, plus auctions, exhibits (like InsideOUT, for a very brief visit at Bonhams), and events the entire week. It’s a destination week in a destination city.

I showed my books at the Manhattan Book Fair on April 11th at the Church of St. Vincent Ferrer, across the street from the four day long ABAA book fair.
The book fair was fun and exhausting. My booth was constantly full of people eager to see and learn more about contemporary fine art bookbinding. I made quite a few new friends and saw some of my favorite regulars:
Lang, Christine, and Coleen

Bookbinders! Lang Ingalls, Christine Giard (creator of half the bindings I showed), and Coleen Curry

It takes more effort than you might think to create a small display like this:
Photo by Cara Schlessinger

Photo by Cara Schlessinger

The day before the fair, my temporary assistant, Michelle McCarthy, and I packed up all of my books and gear, and transported them 20 blocks to the Church of St. Vincent Ferrer. Then we began the really hard work.
IMG_2674

Here we are mostly unpacked and have put on my table cover (required but not provided). Michelle is sorting books. Please note that the display case is how we found it: filthy, no shelves, oddly placed brackets, and a temporary electrical hook-up. All normal. Not to worry.

Thanks to team Red Queen, we had plenty of paper towels and glass cleaner. Ooops! I forgot all about that. I didn’t need them at Codex. While Michelle cleaned the showcase, I mentally mapped the book layout, including shelf placement.  We deployed the tape measure, adjusted the brackets, and locked them down properly (a critical step to be repeated frequently). Then we carefully installed the glass shelves, well away from the slightly warm overhead fluorescent lights.

We start to place the books.

We start to place the books.

More books, and I change my mind.

More books, and I change my mind.

Photo by Diana Adams

Photo by Diana Adams

Am I laughing because almost all of the books are in the display case?

IMG_2683

The final arrangement, including iPad with videos of the kinetic features of Mark Cockram’s
Joseph Cornell: Shadowplay, Eterniday

Not shown: MAC slipcase by Sonya Sheats; TOR by Timothy Ely, Oscar Gillespie, and Robert Rowe; and L’ombre d’un cri bound by Christine Giard. Those three are strategically placed in the display cases of Red Queen Book Arts.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,570 other followers