I Sold Some Books in San Francisco

The San Francisco Bay Area is a hotbed of book arts with a long-standing tradition of French-style binding. Historically, binding in the Northeast US owes more to the English and Germans. I’m not going to discuss dates, patterns of immigration and migration, or happenstance. The research has been done and written about by actual binder-scholars. I refer you to the index to the journal of the Guild of Bookworkers. These days, in San Francisco, you can get excellent training in both French and English binding methods from the many binders who reside and teach in the area.

The point is that in San Francisco there is an especially appreciative audience for exquisitely crafted fine art bindings such as the ones I brought to CODEX.

Continue reading “I Sold Some Books in San Francisco”

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Tini Miura in Person

Allen Ginsberg. Howl, Grabhorn-Hoyem, San Francisco, 1971. 11.5 x 8.75 inches Bound in 1986
Allen Ginsberg. Howl, Grabhorn-Hoyem, San Francisco, 1971. 11.5 x 8.75 inches
Bound in 1986

Truth: I’ve been stalling on writing this post.

I visited Tini Miura a few weeks ago. We spent 3 hours talking. We probably could have spent 3 days. Or 3 weeks. I felt the same with Sonya Sheats, but this was a bit different. My dilemma, my reason for stalling, is that we immediately felt so comfortable together that our conversation got very, very personal very quickly. Much of what was said stays in the vault forever. Teasing out useable material about Tini’s experiences and thoughts on the art and craft of bookbinding has been difficult.

The Song of Solomon, illustrated by Ronald King. Circle Press: London, 1968. 15 x 12 Bound in 1987
The Song of Solomon, illustrated by Ronald King. Circle Press: London, 1968.
15 x 12 Bound in 1987

Tini is one of the greatest binders of the immediate post-war generation. She was born in Kiel, Germany in 1940. Kiel is a port city on the Baltic. It was a major naval base and ship building port for the German Reich. Therefore, the city suffered terrible bombing by the Allies during the war. About 80% of the city was destroyed. Quite naturally, Tini does not like to discuss the war except to say that the Marshall Plan allowed her to grow up quite differently from her husband, Einen. Einen is Japanese. His country did not have the benefit of four years of post-war economic support from the United States and other relatively unscathed nations.

Pierre Loti. La Mort de Philae, with illustrations by Geo Colucci, Paris, Ed. Rene Kieffer, 1924. 9 x11 inches Bound in 2010 Private collection
Pierre Loti. La Mort de Philae, with illustrations by Geo Colucci, Paris, Ed. Rene Kieffer, 1924. 9 x11 inches
Bound in 2010. Private collection.

This wasn’t meant to be a history lesson, but it’s important to me. Tini is the only binder I’ve met whose formative years were spent in this context. It’s a melancholy thought that, without two world wars, Tini would probably not have been able to study in Paris with some of the great French masters. I think that two wars dramatically thinned the male population of potential binders in Europe, leaving a little more room for women to be taken seriously.

William Shakespeare. Venus and Adonis. Arion Press: San Francisco, 1975. 12 x 13  Bound in 1990
William Shakespeare. Venus and Adonis. Arion Press: San Francisco, 1975. 12 x 13
Bound in 1990

So how did Tini become a designer bookbinder? How did she get to the point where she could study in Paris with these legendary binders? Tini was lucky in many ways, but the most important was the encouragement and insight of her father. While Tini originally wanted to be an archeologist and was (and still is) deeply interested in mythology, she decided that she wanted to go to art school and be a book illustrator. She had always drawn and painted and had a

E.J. Stagnelius. Tretton Dikter [Thirteen Poems]. Stockholm, 1951. 11.25 x 9 inches Bound in 1975
E.J. Stagnelius. Tretton Dikter [Thirteen Poems]. Stockholm, 1951.
11 x 9 inches. Bound in 1975.

great love of literature. Sounds like a plan, right? Her father, an art teacher, saw things a bit differently. Being a book illustrator is a wonderful goal, but he thought Tini should know how a book is put together first if she wanted to work in that field. He thought she should first learn what goes into making a book: she should learn to bind. This was a very unusual, even controversial, suggestion. A well-educated young woman from a family of intellectuals should go to university, not a trade school. Her grandfather was especially upset about the plan. Tini liked the idea, though. She enjoyed working with her hands.

The program was quite rigorous. It was ages before the students were permitted to bind a book from start to finish. Prior to that, each step was practiced over and over again until mastered. Possibly this is the source of Tini’s attention to every detail of craftsmanship (we really need a better word for this – craftsperson just sounds stupid). Bench time was alternated with history of the book and visits to great libraries. FINALLY, Tini and her cohort were allowed to put everything they had learned together and actually bind their own books. When Tini looked at her completed book, she knew that this was it: her medium as an artist was bookbinding.

Daigaku Horiguchi.  Érotique. Tokyo, 1965. 8 x 6.24 inches Bound in 1978
Daigaku Horiguchi. Érotique. Tokyo, 1965.
8 x 6 inches. Bound in 1978.

The world of bookbinding is lucky she made that decision. Tini has lived in 7 countries. She has taught in many more. She is one of the founders and a faculty member (1993-2003) of the American Academy of Bookbinding. She has published several books (of which I own two) and there is another to come, on her bindings since 1990. I can’t wait to see it.

See Tini’s plaquettes from 1964.

Herman Melville. Moby Dick. San Francisco, 1979. 15 x 10 inches. Bound in 1983.
Herman Melville. Moby Dick. San Francisco, 1979.
15 x 10 inches. Bound in 1983.
Polka dots: The Twelve Months by The Catharijne Press, The Netherlands. 2 1/2 x 2 inches. Binding date: unknown. Box/fan: Lotus Blossom & Moon Flower, A Chinese folk tale by Carol Cunningham. Sunflower Press CA. 1981 2 1/2 x 2 inches. Binding date unknown.
Polka dots:
The Twelve Months by The Catharijne Press, The Netherlands. 2 1/2 x 2 inches. Binding date unknown.
Box/fan:
Lotus Blossom & Moon Flower, A Chinese folk tale by Carol Cunningham. Sunflower Press CA. 1981. 2 1/2 x 2 inches.
Binding date unknown.
Kerstin Tini Miura. My World of Bibliophile Binding. Kyuryudo, Tokyo, 1980. 14 x 10 inches. Bound in 1981.
Kerstin Tini Miura. My World of Bibliophile Binding. Kyuryudo, Tokyo, 1980. 14 x 10 inches. Bound in 1981.

New bindings by Monique Lallier

Monique Lallier is no stranger in the world of designer bookbinding. Her dedication to service in the field is extraordinary, as is her binding. She began to teach bookbinding in 1976 in Montreal, where she is from, and where she received her initial training in design bookbinding. For more than a decade, she traveled to Europe to study with masters in the field. She served as chair of the Guild of Book Workers Standards of Excellence for twelve years and as director of The American Academy of Bookbinding from 2005-2009, succeeding Tini Miura who was the founding director (more about Tini very soon). Monique continues to teach at AAB and at her studio in Summerfield, North Carolina.

There is much more information about Monique on her website, on the AAB and GBW websites, and other sites all over the web. You can do the googling yourselves. What I have is different.

Monique has been kind enough to allow me to show two bindings that have yet to be published anywhere. The first, Winter Walks, was made for a demonstration on edge-to-edge doublures at the Society of Bookbinders Education and Training Conference in Leeds in August 2013. The other, Lost and Found, is Monique’s contribution to the upcoming Designer Bookbinders exhibit of bindings by North American and British binders (see last post). In Lost and Found, Monique uses a technique that is very unusual and special to her work. Much as a dos-à-dos binding allows for decoration on two more surfaces than usual, Monique creates additional surface area for her design by incorporating an overleaf cover panel. The effect is quite surprising and beautiful.

First, Monique’s binding from Leeds:

Winter Walks, Deep Wood Press, 6 5/8 x 10" Text by Jerry Dennis, illustrated by Glenn Wolff
Winter Walks, Deep Wood Press, 2008. 6 5/8 x 10″
Text by Jerry Dennis, illustrated by Glenn Wolff
Winter Walks doublures
Winter Walks doublures

And now…Monique’s entry for the exhibit Contemporary Bindings of Private Press Books:

Lost and Found, illustrated by Rachel Reckitt. Whittington Press, 2010. 10.5 x 7.5 inches
Lost and Found, illustrated by Rachel Reckitt. Whittington Press, 2010. 10.5 x 7.5 inches
Cover panel closed
Cover panel open
Cover panel open